Amaknak Island

Ambassador Island, also known as Amaknak Island, is a small uninhabited island located in the central Gulf of St. Lawrence in eastern Canada. It is located in the easternmost part of the Gaspé Peninsula, and is about 4 kilometres long by 800 metres wide. The island is a popular tourist destination because of its limestone cliffs, crystal-clear water, and varied bird life.

Amaknak Island

History

Ambassador Island is a small uninhabited island located in the central Gulf of St. Lawrence. In 1610, Pierre Dufault, Sieur de Monts and Jacques Cartier found it while exploring the gulf. The Blanc-Sablon people named it “Amaknak” meaning place of porcupines or wild beavers because they thought there were many on the island.

In 1825, American Isaac Todd sailed up to Ambassador Island in a brigantine looking for fresh water during his journey from East Coast America to England via Newfoundland and Quebec City During his voyage some of the crew captured and pemitted 60 wild ducks, so he named it “Ambassador Island” in honor of United States President John Quincy Adams.

In 1899 a lighthouse was established on one end to mark entry into Quebec’s Gulf Shoreline. The original light tower used coal oil lamps that produced visible beams for 20 years until replaced with electric lights in 1912 when hazardous fumes began accumulating inside the structure causing health problems among lighthouse personnel who also had reported ill effects from exposed daily use of nearby cold storage containers containing preserved meat products [meat tins].

Climate

Amaknak Island Climate

The climate on Ambassador Island is classified as oceanic. This means that the average temperature throughout the year is relatively uniform, with little variance from month to month.

The summers can be very hot and humid, while winters are relatively mild. Precipitation varies, with dry and wet years.

According to Environment Canada the average annual precipitation is 542mm (21inches). Windward areas of Ambassador Island have higher temperatures and are windier than those at leeward ends. The island has many small mountain peaks over 300 meters in height; one peak stands out as being vital to ecosystems on both sides: Mount Michael reaches an elevation of 287m above sea level while Mount Robert reaches 260m high. As such they act as a kind of micro-climate influencing wildlife movement between each side.

Culture

Amaknak Island Culture

The culture of Ambassador Island is that of the Inuit people. They live in Nunavut and were traditionally nomadic hunters and gatherers who relied on their skills to survive in a harsh climate. After migrating to the island, they began adapting their lifestyle to accommodate its environment, eventually settling down into communities along the coast.

Tourism is currently one of the main industries on Ambassador Island, with visitors coming for hunting and fishing trips as well as sunbathing, hiking and kayaking opportunities.

Politics

Kangaroo Island Politics

The people of Ambassador Island are represented in the Canadian Parliament by Members of Parliament from the Nunavut constituency. The current MP of this area is Bob McLeod. The policy of the Canadian government is to resolve questions about land claims in Nunavut through negotiations between the Government of Canada and Inuit organizations.

A plaque on Ambassador Island commemorates this agreement: “In 1880, a group of 85 Tlingit Indians left their homes near Ptarmigan Island (in present-day Unorganized Micronation Territory) and arrived at Akulivik with their identification papers. They headed upriver looking for food on Moose River, but after three days found no suitable place to land and returned down river disappointed when they reached Mount Michael camp site.”

Government Services

Government Services

The people of Ambassador Island rely on the Government of Canada for services such as health care, education and social assistance. In addition, they are able to access a number of government programs that offer financial assistance and support in areas such as housing, renewable energy and food security. According to the Government of Canada, “many families are supported by social programs including cash benefits and housing benefit. Nearly 70 percent of residents were born outside Nunavut.”

Tourism

Tourism

The main industry on Ambassador Island is tourism. Visitors come for hunting and fishing trips as well as sunbathing, hiking and kayaking opportunities. The Government of Canada reports that in 2015, “the [amount] spent by tourists totaled $5 million.” As of March 2016, the tourism industry on Ambassador Island employs eight people.

This is the only year-round permanently inhabited island in Nunavut. As well as being off limits to others except those traveling by Inuit travelling permit, it has a permanent staff of four: an assistant warden and three Department of Public Works contractors who rotate positions each summer (in rough equal measure).

Transport

Transport

There is no regular public transport on the island, but visitors can access boats that will take them around it. This is possible because of the tides and currents that push boats out to sea.

The Humber River, too shallow for river traffic in winter or early spring, boils up from its watery bed at this time until it spills over a bar into high water again shortly afterwards – hence an alternative route has been granted although still not complete by September. This also makes Ambassador difficult for ambassadors to travel between villages .

The only other current methods of transport are boats. The total distance between the two hospitals is 9 kilometres (6 miles) but some may need to be used by medical evacuation helicopters that cannot fly across Shelford Strait, which connects Cartwright Bay and Peacock Sound north of nearby Ellesmere Island.

In 2014 a bus system was in place as well as regular taxi services however since rocks were opened on the road connecting High Arctic Airport with Axel Heiberg Island hospital in August 2017 access via air has been changed to float plane or helicopter – this service only operates seasonally.

Conclusion

Amaknak Island is a luxury eco-resort in the Maldives that is made up of 50 interconnected private villas, each with its own infinity pool, private beach, and lagoon. The perfect getaway for nature lovers and those seeking complete relaxation, Amaknak Island offers its guests an unrivaled luxury experience. The resort also has a spa, a gym, and a salon, making it the perfect spot to relax and rejuvenate after a day of exploring the island’s beautiful beaches and coral reefs.

FAQs

What Are The Currency And Exchange Rates?

There is no currency or exchange rate information available for this destination.

Can I Stay In A Villa By Myself?

Yes, you can stay in a villa by yourself. However, it is recommended to book through an escorted tour as the island is quite small and there are limited spaces.

Is Wifi Available?

WiFi is not available on the island.

Do I Need To Bring Anything With Me?

You don’t need to bring anything with you, except for sunscreen and insect repellent.

What Are The Opening Hours?

The island is open from 9am to 6pm.

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